Natural Hairstyle

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Natural Hairstyle

When I decided to transition my hair from relaxed to natural over the course of a year or so, I naively thought I could continue my usual lazy-girl routine — which basically consisted of going to the hairdresser and having someone else deal with the mess on my head. But, as more and more new growth began to replace my straighter strands, I became concerned about not only the heat damage that might occur in the long run, but the fact that I was relying on somebody else to do all the work. So, I took on the task of doing my own hair.I quickly realized I had no idea what I was doing. Turns out, reading countless natural hair blogs and watching many hours of YouTube tutorials does not make one an expert. My first twist-out was such a fail, I ended up covering my hack job with a hat. Don’t even get me started on my botched bantu knots. Lawd.AdvertisementAnyone who’s gone natural, or is in the transitioning process, knows the pain I’m preaching. Trying to blend two vastly different textures — while coming up with hairstyles that are presentable enough to go out in public with — is hard work. That’s why I enlisted Vida Latimer, senior stylist at Devachan Salon, to help transitioning ladies get through the awkward stages and see the light at the end of the natural hair tunnel.Click through for some new looks to try out, broken down by your stage in the transitioning process.Read More:What These 12 Celebrities Look Like With Their Natural Hair”Hair Dusting” Is The Secret To Healthier, Longer HairThis Weird Gadget Is Going To Change The Way You Do Your Hair

Natural Hairstyle

For a quick African American natural hairstyle, try a half-up top knot, which is very on trend. What really makes this look special is how beautifully that cinnamon shade looks against her warm-toned skin. Ask your stylist what shade would help bring out your inner glow.

Natural Hairstyle

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A twist-out is an easy natural hairstyle for short hair that African-American women can use to achieve full curls sans heat. It’s a popular protective style among the “naturalistas”. The style is easy to maintain, it can be slept on without messing up the curl pattern. This look combines a flat twist detail in the front to further protect the edges of the hair, which are the most prone to breakage.

Natural Hairstyle

How much time daily would you like to spend on your hair styling? I bet minimum but you definitely wouldn’t like going out with your hair sticking out in some sort of explosion on your head. Well, African-American women are blessed with thick dense hair that can be skillfully shaped into breathtaking hairstyles. However, natural dryness and brittleness of kinky hair is the other side of the medal that needs special care. Protective hairstyles aim to limit the stress of environmental factors on natural hair. Here we are going to share 45 easy yet very showy protective hairstyles and tips on how to care for your natural hair.

Natural Hairstyle

This hairstyle is short, cute and super easy, and it works best with naturally curly hair. Wash-and-go is great for your hair when done right, and it looks great on most hair textures. Find the routine that has proved to be the most effective for your hair with the products that are specific for your hair type and curl pattern. Once you get the hang of your routine, it’ll be a cinch to rock this style.

Natural Hairstyle

Individual braids are a go-to protective hairstyle for African American women, as they provide more versatility than flat cornrows and twists. For shorter styles with braids use a hair accessory like a thick headband. Is it winter or summer outdoors, you will always look great.

Janet Jackson made this hairstyle popular by her role in Poetic Justice, and ever since, we’ve been hooked. The box braids takes us naturals back to the 90’s when style was a perfect blend of sassy yet beautiful (think Dionne in Clueless).

Braid or twist your hair close to the scalp, starting at the nape of the neck up to the top. Repeat this in small sections all over the head and top it off with a head full of gorgeous ringlets. The stunning explosion of cute curls up top will become the focal point of your hairstyle at front, while the braids will enhance its visual interest from the sides and back.

Braiding or twisting your hair tightly and pulling it into a bun might seem damaging, but it can actually be a good occasional practice for ethnic hair that is getting a bit unruly. This is a protective hairstyle that is as sophisticated, as it is easy to maintain.

Faking an undercut is simplicity itself – do it with a few side braids. The braids and twists in this hairstyle definitely stand out, but the tawny, gorgeous profusion of curls is the real statement. This woman is fierce, and she knows it.

Who says pinup styles are a thing of the past? Natural hair with a 50’s twist is both classic and modern, depending on how you do it. This style incorporates a pastel bandana, and the ever-favorite front bump. The contrast between the natural curls atop and the smoothed sides is deliberately stylish.

Short on the sides, length up top, honestly, this is one of the simplest short natural haircuts. This style is a common favorite amongst the natural community. It’s easy to maintain and incredibly fun to experiment with. Try a variety of lengths and colors to enhance the creativity of the cut.

The Natural Hair Movement is an era of fearless, beautiful men, women, and children sporting their hair in its natural state. For those of us who want to stay true to our roots and still have options for changing up our personal style with no chemical shame, these 21 hairstyles (in no particular order) are some of the most popular in the world among the #teamnatural crowd.

When parents and students in Louisville, Kentucky, got wind of Butler Traditional High School’s dress code policies forbidding certain hairstyles, they spoke up and spoke out. The policy – which outlawed cornrows, twists and dreadlocks, among other styles – was first revealed to parents and students on a pink handout at registration in late July. “Hair styles that are extreme, distracting, or attention-getting will not be permitted,” the flyer read. “No dreadlocks, cornrolls (sic), twists, mohawks, no jewelry will be worn in the hair. No braids will be allowed on males.” “Those students who come to school in violation of the dress code will not be allowed to attend class or circulate through the school until their attire is corrected,” the flyer continued. “We feel that a student’s academic success is directly correlated to appropriate attire and appearance.” Soooo…my daughter had registration today and let’s just say she’s not happy abt the #JCPS no natural hair policy. pic.twitter.com/ApPDyv3sbo — Attica Scott (@atticascott) July 27, 2016 Butler Traditional High School students and parents – including State Representative elect Attica Scott – quickly took to social media to express their disdain for the policy, many calling it “cultural appropriation.” “My intelligent, straight-A, 4.0 daughter can’t wear her natural hair in braids to school?” remarked one mom. Hmmm. My Intelligent,STRAIGHT

When parents and students in Louisville, Kentucky, got wind of Butler Traditional High School’s dress code policies forbidding certain hairstyles, they spoke up and spoke out. The policy – which outlawed cornrows, twists and dreadlocks, among other styles – was first revealed to parents and students on a pink handout at registration in late July. “Hair styles that are extreme, distracting, or attention-getting will not be permitted,” the flyer read. “No dreadlocks, cornrolls (sic), twists, mohawks, no jewelry will be worn in the hair. No braids will be allowed on males.” “Those students who come to school in violation of the dress code will not be allowed to attend class or circulate through the school until their attire is corrected,” the flyer continued. “We feel that a student’s academic success is directly correlated to appropriate attire and appearance.” Soooo…my daughter had registration today and let’s just say she’s not happy abt the #JCPS no natural hair policy. pic.twitter.com/ApPDyv3sbo — Attica Scott (@atticascott) July 27, 2016 Butler Traditional High School students and parents – including State Representative elect Attica Scott – quickly took to social media to express their disdain for the policy, many calling it “cultural appropriation.” “My intelligent, straight-A, 4.0 daughter can’t wear her natural hair in braids to school?” remarked one mom. Hmmm. My Intelligent,STRAIGHT
Anyone who’s gone natural, or is in the transitioning process, knows the pain I’m preaching. Trying to blend two vastly different textures — while coming up with hairstyles that are presentable enough to go out in public with — is hard work. That’s why I enlisted Vida Latimer, senior stylist at Devachan Salon, to help transitioning ladies get through the awkward stages and see the light at the end of the natural hair tunnel.

 

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