1920s Hairstyles

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1920s Hairstyles

One of my favorite books of all time, The Great Gatsby has been made into a movie! I don’t know if I will go see it, but I sure do love making roaring 20’s inspired hairstyles. Over the last year on HTHG, I have used many different eras as style inspiration for DIY hairstyles. Today on HTHG I am celebrating hair during the depression era, from the elite flapper girls to the dust bowl pioneers. For Art Nouveau inspired hairstyles, check out this post. Here are links to tutorials for each of the looks on the above photo collage……..Starting at the top of vertical column 1…… Gatsby girl Scarf roll Sexy Sheba Starting at the top of vertical column 2….. DIY feather fascinator DIY finger wave and curl set for beginners! Dorothea dust bowl bun And starting at the top of vertical column 3….. 4th day Art Nouveau hair Valentines Day pretty hair Bootleg Faux-bob The featured Image of this post is the fish-tail faux-bob, a look demonstrated in a collaboration with latest-hairstyles. Click the link for the tutorial! Which one is your favorite? I always feel so feminine and chic when tressed in 1920’s era hair. I love the finger waves.

1920s Hairstyles

Women’s short hair movement was rung into the new decade by F. Scott Fitzgerald’s short story, “Bernice Bobs Her Hair” Fitzgerald’s story is about a socially inept Midwestern girl who is tricked into cutting her hair short by her rival.Like many young women of the early 1920s, she runs away from “decent” middle-America, presumably to New York City the whirling hub of action during the Roaring Twenties. The Popular 1920s Bobbed Hairstyle

1920s Hairstyles

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Hairstyles of the 1920s created more controversy in hair fashion than in any other period of American culture. And one hairstyle, known simply as

1920s Hairstyles

The Bob by Michael Warner Music Courtesy of Bill Edwards* Hairstyles of the 1920s created more controversy in hair fashion than in any other period of American culture. And one hairstyle, known simply as

1920s Hairstyles

Another highlight of the ’20s that exemplified change was the evolution of women’s hairstyles. Ladies were saying goodbye to their long Victorian locks and welcoming much shorter hairdos. The mass appeal of this trend wasn’t accepted by many salons, so barbers became the go-to for 1920s hairdressing. Armed with close-cutting scissors known as shears, these bold women were in well-trained hands. Elaborate and expensive jewels worn as headpieces added a feminine touch.

1920s Hairstyles

Louise Brooks’ “Dutch Boy” hairstyle, though not the most popular, is probably the most iconic style of the 1920s hairstyles. The very square look with the bangs and sides that frame Brooks’ beautiful face show the influence of the Art Deco movement with their sharp angles and square lines.

Louise Brooks Dutch Boy Louise Brooks’ “Dutch Boy” hairstyle, though not the most popular, is probably the most iconic style of the 1920s hairstyles. The very square look with the bangs and sides that frame Brooks’ beautiful face show the influence of the Art Deco movement with their sharp angles and square lines. Brooks will always be remembered as “the girl in the black helmet” because of her hair.

Make no mistake. In the 1920s, a woman deciding to cut her hair was serious business. Simply put, long hair was considered feminine and short hair was not. Consider F. Scott Fitzgerald’s short story from 1920 called “Bernice Bobs Her Hair.” Bernice, the quintessential predictable woman, is tricked into getting her hair cut into a bob. She is suddenly shunned by the boys while her family worries about the scandal her new ‘do will cause.

Women’s short hair movement was rung into the new decade by F. Scott Fitzgerald’s short story, “Bernice Bobs Her Hair” Fitzgerald’s story is about a socially inept Midwestern girl who is tricked into cutting her hair short by her rival.Like many young women of the early 1920s, she runs away from “decent” middle-America, presumably to New York City the whirling hub of action during the Roaring Twenties.

Shingled Hair Style The Shingled hairstyle had several variations that appeared throughout the 1920s. Antoine, the most famous French hairdresser of the period perfected the Shingle cut in 1925. Shingled hair was marked by its very short length at the back of a woman’s neck. Shingled hair lay flat to the woman’s head, and covered her ears. Sometimes “spit curls”, little ringlets, were put into the hair at a young woman’s forehead or cheeks.

The Shingled hairstyle had several variations that appeared throughout the 1920s. Antoine, the most famous French hairdresser of the period perfected the Shingle cut in 1925. Shingled hair was marked by its very short length at the back of a woman’s neck. Shingled hair lay flat to the woman’s head, and covered her ears. Sometimes “spit curls”, little ringlets, were put into the hair at a young woman’s forehead or cheeks.

If you haven’t read it, please do. Read it before you go see the blockbuster movie that comes out next spring. I predict that 1920’s hairstyles are going to be HUGE next year, so lets get started early.

(Photo styled by Mel Arens, Mayapple boutique) Zelda Fitzgerald was the dynamic and willful wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald, iconic author of The Great Gatsby. The lead female character in that book, Daisy Buchanan was loosely based on Zelda. She was gorgeous and fashionable and hob-nobbed with the boot-legging elite of New York in the 1920’s. If you haven’t read it, please do. Read it before you go see the blockbuster movie that comes out next spring. I predict that 1920’s hairstyles are going to be HUGE next year, so lets get started early. Here is my interpretation of what Zelda’s hair must have looked like when attending a swank New York party. This 1920’s inspired DIY Gatsby girl hairstyle is much easier than it looks. I threw it together on a whim of experimentation on Whitney, my daughter’s fabulous kindergarten art teacher. I think she looks absolutely perfect as Zelda Fitzgerald. Her hair is fine and medium-long. It is heavily highlighted, which helps it hold a style. I used no styling products. If you have very slick hair, you will definitely need a good texture spray to disperse throughout your hair to hold this style. Because it is a very drape-y and loose hairstyle, It is hard to do on thick straight, coarse hair. If that’s what you have, first set your hair with texture spray on damp hair, and one of HTHG’s no heat curl techniques. This will help it hold. Definately get some long bobby pins, too. Here is how I did it….. 1. Start by sectioning the hair down the side of the back. One side should be about 2/3rds of the head, and the other should be about 1/3rd of the head. 2.On the heavy side, begin a twist that starts at the temple and wraps around the back of the head. 3. Continue the twist all the way to the end of the section. 4.Wrap the end into a loose bun and pin  through the bun with large bobby pins. 5. Reinforce the twist with a couple small bobby pins.Don’t worry about making a really neat bun. It looks better loose. 6. Now make another section that comes down from the top of the head to just in front of the ear. 7. twist that section down to the ends of the hair. 8. Now wrap it into a loose bun and pin it into place slightly above the first bun. Take a swig of a PBR and get ready for the next step. 9. Make another section that leaves just a small amount of hair around the face. Twist it back and pin it into a small loose bun. This time use little bobby pins so you can hide them better. 10. Take the last little bit of hair and twist it into a tiny little pincurl. 11. Snuggle it in with the curl before it and try and hide the pin. 12. Now give it a spray of firm hold hair spray if you want. It will help it hold. Bootleg bride, anyone? Flapper? red carpet starlet? stuck at home on a rainy day? DO IT! XOXO

 

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